Addicted to Conflict

unknownI feel that we, as a society, are addicted to conflict. Everything from our sporting events to our television shows to our political system is predicated on conflict. One team beating another team. One television show character in conflict with another character (think of every “reality” tv show). One political party using words, press releases, legislation and speeches to create conflict with the other. Sometimes I feel we haven’t come very far from the Roman citizens shouting for blood in the Coliseum.

Conflict gives us purpose. It gives us authority. It gives us a side to be on and a group to belong to. Or at least it gives us the illusion of those things. And perhaps like the Roman citizens in the Coliseum, all of our conflicts, or illusions of conflicts, keep us distracted and preoccupied from seeing the real conflicts that fester right under the surface.

It’s the conflicts that we find festering under the surface, however, that really impact the world. In the scope of the eighty-something years we live on the earth, the fact that our team won the game pales in comparison to the struggle against poverty. Ending the use of child soldiers in global conflicts ranks just a little higher than whether this reality star is going to get into a shouting match with that other reality star. And yet SportsCenter grabs our attention and the talk shows grab our attention. I wonder what it would take of the real conflicts to grab our attention.

Especially at Advent, as we look forward to the coming of the Messiah, we should be drawn to see the world with big eyes. The Messiah- the one who would set the world right again, the one who would defeat evil, the one who would establish justice and righteousness, the one who would be placed on the throne of David forever- is the one who would bring peace into the conflicts.


As we look forward to the coming of the Messiah, we should be drawn to see the world with big eyes.


Yet Christmas brings the temptation to draw us further into the world of decorations, presents and parties. It brings the temptation to make our eyes smaller and turned in on ourselves instead making them bigger and turning them outward to celebrate the Messiah that has come, to see what the Messiah has done in the world, grieve that there are still conflicts in the world and anticipate the Messiah’s return when Jesus, the King-elect, will be coronated to reign forever.

Today, take a few minutes and turn your eyes to the world. Look at:

  • Syria and the violence to children and civilians
  • Nigeria, the persecution of Christians and the 2.1 million people displaced by conflict there
  • Refugees
  • The 45 million people in the US living at the poverty line
  • The 2.3 million people incarcerated in the US

What else in the world do we need to see? Let us know in the comment section.

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