Gone: A story of loss and discovery

goneA book for anyone who has experienced loss. Min Kym lost a million dollar Stradivarius violin, or rather had it stolen, you might have experienced a loss or had something stolen or taken away from you. If you have you can easily relate to Kym’s story.

Min Kym was born in South Korea but grew up in London. At a very early age she exhibited a gift playing the violin and inherited the blessed/curse title of “child prodigy.” Her memoir, Gone: A Girl, A Violin, A Life Unstrung tells the story of her discovery, growth,  and refinement of her life as a violin soloist and how it shattered right before her eyes.

The book revolves around three themes. First, the theme of musicianship. Kym is a violinist and the book sets the reader deep into the world of composers, compositions, and the feelings that come from playing and hearing specific pieces of music. To fully engage with this theme, it is helpful (although not necessary) for the reader to have a basic musical background or, at least, an appreciation for classical composers and classical music.

The second theme is of loss. The uniting of Kym and her Stradivarius is similar to finding the love of one’s life. In fact she writes, “There was no question, no doubt. It was love at first sight. love and everything else: honor, obedience, trust, everything” (84). And just like a love, Kym does an excellent job describing the indescribable: the way that a musician and an instrument discover each other and push each other to greatness. Then, in a moment, all of it stolen and Kym invites the reader into her loss, grief, anger, and despair. Her violin isn’t gone, part of herself is gone. Which brings us to the third theme: self-awareness.

Throughout the book Kym finds herself within the struggle of discovering her voice. She struggles with the traditions of her Korean family. She struggles with demanding teachers and a domineering boyfriend. Ultimately, I think Kym discovers that, not only does she have a voice, she has two: one as a person without the violin and one as a musician with her violin. She writes, “There was a person lurking somewhere inside me that didn’t need a violin to communicate with people…I did have a voice” (135). At the same time, it’s through music that she speaks to the world, with her Stradivarius gone, will she be able to awaken that voice again? I’ll let you read the book and find out.

I received this book from Blogging for Books in exchange for this review.

Like Reading a Seven-course Meal

as kingfishersOver the last year or two I’ve come to appreciate the pastoral wisdom of Eugene Peterson. Previously I had known him as the writer of The Message: The Bible in Contemporary Language but I didn’t know that he was first and foremost a pastor. He was the founding pastor of Christ Our King Presbyterian Church in Maryland and lead the church for 29 years.

As Kingfishers Catch Fire: A Conversation on the Ways of God Formed by the Words of God is a book that is directly birthed out of Peterson’s pastoral experience. In fact, the book is built around 49 of Peterson’s sermons, preached to his church. The book reaches to dramatic heights and delves into phenomenal depths. Peterson’s words show the richness of scripture while making them accessible and able to be brought into the sermons of pastors today.

As Kingfishers Catch Fire is a collection of 49 sermons grouped into seven sections. Each section is introduced by Peterson to invite the reader into the conversation of what it means to preach in the “company” of Moses, David, Isaiah, Solomon, Peter, Paul and John. By “company” Peterson means for the reader to “enter into the biblical company of prototypical preachers and work out of the traditions they had developed under the guidance of the Holy Spirit” (xxi). Peterson achieves this goal beautifully; he speaks of story telling, praying and poetry, allowing our imaginations to be “Jesus-filled,” and preaching theologically.

There is so much good in this book that it is hard to pick just one example- but I’ll do just that. In the introduction to “Preaching in the Company of Isaiah,” Peterson says this: “The unrelenting reality is that prophets don’t fit into our way of life. For a people who are accustomed to fitting God into our lives or, as we like to say, ‘making room for God,’ the prophets are hard to take and easy to dismiss. The God of whom the prophets speak is far too large to fit into our lives. If we want anything to do with God, we have to fit into God” (116). This is such a profound and needed flip that we must do-especially within our Western culture. God cannot be something I just add into my life. As if we can add God to the plate of our already full lives. We must flip our understanding to see that we fit into God. We join God. We are found in God. We become a part of what God is doing. Peterson points out such an important point in this short paragraph- and that is just one example.

This is one of the books I will continually reference and quote within my own sermons and sermon preparation. When this book is released on May 16, 2017, it needs to be on your list to buy, read and reflect upon.

I received this book from Blogging for Book in exchange for this review. Find more information on the book here.

Or watch this extremely interesting short-film featuring Eugene Peterson and Bono talking together about Psalms.

No Outsiders

I ran into this song last week and it’s a great reminder that no one is excluded from coming to God.

That is especially important to remember as we just celebrated Easter. We say, “Jesus died for everyone.” But sometimes we say it but we forget what that means. Jesus died for the homeless man, Jesus died for the terrorist, Jesus died for sex worker, Jesus died for the elite, Jesus died for the forgotten, Jesus died for the educated, Jesus died for the oppressed, Jesus died for you and Jesus died for me.

In Jesus, there are no outsiders.

The Sin of Texting While Driving

New-Braunfels-bus-crash_600You may have heard about the bus crash involving a group of senior adults from First Baptist Church, New Braunfels, TX. The crash killed 13 people and in the last few days it has come to light that the 20 year-old driver of the truck that struck the church bus was engaged in texting while he was driving.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that, in 2015 alone, almost 3,500 people were killed and another 391,000 people were injured in accident involving a distracted driver. I also read that an estimated 78% of accidents caused by a distracted driver occurred because the driver in question was texting.

You’ve seen people texting while they drive. You’ve probably done it yourself. I’m not throwing stones from a glass house; I admit that I’ve done it. Although, I’m made a conscious effort to stop. One reason for this it that for several years a major portion of my job consisted of driving from worksite to worksite and I was always shocked that while driving on one major highway, I typically saw more people texting on their phones than not texting on their phones. I could usually tell because the car was swerving or failing to maintain a constant speed and, more often than not, when I would pass them, they were on their phone.

Texting while driving has become an dangerous epidemic. You’ve probably noticed that there are more PSAs on texting while driving on television and radio. And while there are various laws, and sometimes no laws, regulating texting while driving, as Jesus followers we are to follow a ethic above the law.

Texting while driving is, not only potentially against the law, it is a sin.

Wait! There’s nothing in the Bible about texting while driving, how can I call it a sin? Let me explain.

Sin, in it’s most basic, is idolatry. Idolatry is when we place anything above God. We place pleasure above God. We place money above God. We place the desire to get our own way above God. We place ourselves above God.

Texting while driving is a form of placing ourselves first. It’s selfishness. It’s saying, “My conversation is more important than the risk to your life.” It’s careless, reckless and selfish and it’s saying that I am more important than anyone else who’s trying to go to work, pick their kids up from school, or go to the store. It’s saying that I want to do what I want, regardless of it’s potential effects on others. And that is sinful.

Jesus tells us to put ourselves last- take the last seat at the banquet- and be a servant- wash the feet of others. Jesus tells us to love those around us as ourselves. We may not go to banquets where we can take the last seat but we can put the cell phone away while we drive. We may not wash someone else’s feet but we can put the cell phone away while we drive. It’s one of the ways that we love those around us as we hold their life with more honor than we hold a text message.

Commit now, put others above yourself and put the phone away while you drive. Don’t trade someone’s life for a text.

North Korea and The Good Shepherd

I’m fascinated with pictures of North Korea. The dichotomy between the “public” life and the “private” life of the country is unsettling. It appears, from all accounts, that the picture of success, power and happiness that the country wants to show the world is nothing more than a charade. The reality is much different. It appears that life there is hard and the government gives the people just enough perks to keep them content. Censorship, control and fear keep the citizens of North Korea from knowing and experiencing the prosperity and freedom that exists just a few miles away in South Korea- which ranks in the top 50 countries in the world in per capita GDP. By comparison, North Korea ranks 210 out of 229 countries.

Why do the citizens of North Korea allow this?

They allow it because they don’t know any better. For most of them they cannot even imagine a life different than the one they live.

Doesn’t that sound like a lot of people you know? People who live their lives never knowing, never imagining that life could be anything more than what they are experiencing. Life can’t be anything more than stress- financial, emotional, or familial. Life can’t be anything more than counting the hours until 5 o’clock- day after day. Life can’t be anything more than rejection.

We may know people like that, but are you and I people like that? Can we fall into that same mindset? Absolutely we can.

In a very familiar verse, Jesus says “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly” (John 10:10). Jesus says that in him, there is life and, more than just life, there is full life and in the following verses he says that it is an eternally safe life. Jesus is not saying that there won’t be stress- but that it cannot steal your life. Jesus is not saying that there won’t be days that are boring or numbing- but that they cannot kill your life. Jesus is not saying that you won’t experience rejection- but that it cannot destroy your life.

This isn’t “Joel Osteen” positive thinking Christianity, this is Christianity under the watch and care of Jesus, the good shepherd.

As sheep we either know the voice of Jesus and follow him or we follow the thief, the robber, or hired hand and when the wolf comes the thief, robber, and hired hand don’t protect the sheep, they exploit the sheep. The good shepherd, Jesus, stands in-between the sheep and wolf and lays down his life for the sheep. The sheep are the same and the wolf is the same but what’s different is the shepherd.

Is your life full? Who is your shepherd?

 

Living Like Patrick Beyond St. Patrick’s Day

Unknown-1Last Wednesday and last Sunday, I shared with my church a little of the story of St. Patrick. It’s a fascinating story; Patrick: kidnapped and sold as a slave in Ireland, learned Celtic language and culture, escaped, but was called by God to return and preach Christ among the Irish Celts. After Patrick’s death, a number of factors lead to Celtic Christianity developing largely independently from Christianity found in England or mainland Europe.

The Celtic brand of Christianity still exists among a few communities but their way of life and their expression of Christianity can teach us some lessons in having a more vibrant faith.

First, they made a conscious effort to integrate faith into every area of life. Celtic Christians wrote prayers for almost every aspect of life: beginning of the day, end of the day, cooking and working. They wrote prayers for marriage, children, blessing a new home, and for dying. These prayers are often called “contemplative,” and are “an ongoing, or very frequent, opening of the heart to the Triune God, often while engaging in each of the many experiences that fill a day” (Hunter, III).

Our lives tend to be segmented and compartmentalized. We have our spiritual life, sure, but we also have our work life, our home life, and our social life. Contemplative prayer helps us see that all of life is connected and all of life can be influenced and influence our spiritual life.

Second, and in a similar vein, was the formation of the monastic communities. Throughout Europe, monasteries were a common place for the ultra-religious to go to escape from the world. They were located outside of cities, on mountains, or off the beaten path. In Ireland, Christians built communities that were  monastic (people living under a religious vow). They were little towns with monks, nuns and priests but also families, farmers, carpenters, herders and craftsman. Again it showed how they saw all of life integrated, with no “religious” and “secular” differentiation.

Third, Celtic Christians naturally saw God within nature. The clover, held by Patrick in many pictures, was used to explain the mysterious nature of the Trinity. As a culture centered around farming, herding and fishing it is understandable that the forces of nature would play a large role in their lives and when they learned of the God who created and controls the forces of nature, it was easy to see God’s hand in it. Again, not even nature is outside of our normal lives- although many of us have tried to eliminate hot, cold, rain and wind from our lives. We can see God in the sunshine and rain, we can hear God in the call of the birds and we can use what God has made to understand God better.

The constant theme of each of these Celtic Christian expressions of faith is the way that they integrate faith into everyday life. That is something we can all be reminded of in our lives. It’s been 1,585 years since Patrick took Christianity to Ireland but we can still learn from their example.

 

Sources:

The Celtic Way of Evangelism: How Christianity Can Reach the West Again. George G. Hunter, III. Abington Press, 2000.

Celtic Daily Prayer. Harper One, 2002.

 

Talking With God: Not deep but still refreshing

9781601429445Sometimes praying is hard. If prayer wasn’t hard, then some of our greatest theologians, scholars and pastors wouldn’t have spent the time and energy writing books about prayer. In his book Talking with God: What To Say When You Don’t Know How To Pray, Adam Weber adds his voice to many others on the subject of prayer. Weber is the lead pastor of Embrace, based in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Weber writes a book that feels personal, even though it’s story-filled and light on in-depth teaching. Talking with God is theologically sound but basic. There is nothing earth-shaking in the book and, in a way, that’s refreshing. Weber doesn’t project to know a way to pray that “changes everything” or a “new” method of prayer, what he brings are simple ideas about prayer. They are ideas that the reader can put into practice no matter how long they have been a believer. This book is not for someone looking for an in-depth study on prayer, however, this book is a good introduction on prayer for a non-Christian, a new Christian or a student. But it does have good reminders on what it means to pray and how we can pray within the different circumstance in which we find ourselves.

Overall, it was a pleasant read and it is one that I’ll keep in order to pass along to someone looking for an introduction to prayer.

I received this book from Blogging for Book in exchange for this review.